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Historia Da Arte

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art Cats funny - 9363603456

Submitted by: (via arthusiast.art)

Tagged: art , Cats , funny
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Spoyl
27 days ago
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Eye Sky a Dragon

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Eye Sky a Dragon What do you see when you look into this sky? In the center, in the dark, do you see a night sky filled with stars? Do you see a sunset to the left? Clouds all around? Do you see the central band of our Milky Way Galaxy running down the middle? Do you see the ruins of an abandoned outpost on a hill? (The outpost is on Askold Island, Russia.) Do you see a photographer with a headlamp contemplating surreal surroundings? (The image is a panorama of 38 images taken last month and compiled into a Little Planet projection.) Do you see a rugged path lined with steps? Or do you see the eye of a dragon?
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Spoyl
27 days ago
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Gaming's #MeToo moment: male fragility versus women's fundamental rights

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The latest turn in the Gamergate sage: Zoe Quinn (previously) outed their former partner, game dev Alec Holowka as a sexual and emotional abuser, which prompted others to come forward with their own stories of abuse at Holowka's hands, which led to Holowka being kicked out of his Night in the Woods game project -- and shortly thereafter, Holowka committed suicide.

Though Holowka made a point of telling people not to blame Quinn or the other women who came forward for his death, the shitty men of Gamergate -- who already consider Quinn to be the living embodiment of the antichrist -- launched a campaign of terror and harassment so extreme that Quinn has resigned from Twitter.

Central to Gamergate's indictment of Quinn is that she should have given more considerations to Holowka's emotional health before coming forward to reveal the ways he'd abused her.

Laurie Penny (previously) reaffirms her status as a national treasure in her Wired op-ed on the matter, pointing out the asymmetry of this concern for male fragility, and how it never extends to an equivalent concern for the much more severe emotional, physical and economic toll born by women who survive the abuse doled out by these broken men.

And the men are broken: toxic masculinity is a thing. Hurt people hurt people. Trauma, not contagion, is the source of radicalization. Any solution to sexism and misogyny will involve helping men as well as women, because men, not women, are the primary reservoirs of misogyny.

Penny's trademark is empathy without sympathy: understanding the forces that lead to people doing terrible things without letting people off the hook for their terrible choices. She's in perfect form in this essay.

Here’s a thought: What if people started thinking about the effect on victims’ mental health before they make the decision to abuse, bully, and rape? Women in games—like women in entertainment, politics, journalism, and every other industry that has been shaken by #MeToo allegations—have learned not to speak about our exhaustion, our pain and trauma. We have learned to come across as carefully neutral, as endlessly reasonable, to hide the depression, the fear, the anxiety. For every man whose behavior has been excused because of his mental health problems, there are countless women and queer people whose mental health problems have been weaponized against them, to dismiss what they say. The risk that male violence poses to women’s mental health—women who have been harassed or assaulted are far more likely to be diagnosed with anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder, and up to 13 percent of rape victims attempt suicide—is not considered worthy of comment.

This is what happens within industries where men have most of the power and seniority—and, crucially, it is also how male power perpetuates. Women quietly drop out of professions and workplaces where they are routinely hurt, demeaned, and isolated. The damage is borne in private by the victims themselves, and by networks of women doing the emotional deep-cleaning so that men don’t have to be confronted with the damage they’ve done.

Gaming's #MeToo Moment and the Tyranny of Male Fragility [Laurie Penny/Wired]

(Image: Molly Crabapple)

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Spoyl
43 days ago
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Man is pretty hardcore

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“No sympathy for the devil; keep that in mind. Buy the ticket, take the ride...and if it occasionally gets a little heavier than what you had in mind, well...maybe chalk it up to forced consciousness expansion: Tune in, freak out, get beaten.” --Hunter S. Thompson, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas Read the rest

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Spoyl
53 days ago
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Clapback Code

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Follow @lamebook on instagram for more content!

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Spoyl
59 days ago
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MotherHydra
60 days ago
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Gotem.
Space City, USA

The word "robot" originated in this 1921 Czech play

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In 1920, Czech writer Karel Čapek penned a play titled R.U.R., a cautionary tale about technology's potential to dehumanize. R.U.R. stands for "Rossum’s Universal Robots" and it was this play that introduced the word "robot" to the world (apparently coined by Karel's brother Josef). At the MIT Press Reader, John Jordan, author of the book Robots, digs into the continued influence of R.U.R.:

Like many of his peers, (Čapek) was appalled by the carnage wrought by the mechanical and chemical weapons that marked World War I as a departure from previous combat. He was also deeply skeptical of the utopian notions of science and technology. “The product of the human brain has escaped the control of human hands,” Čapek told the London Saturday Review following the play’s premiere. “This is the comedy of science.”

In that same interview, Čapek reflected on the origin of one of the play’s characters:

The old inventor, Mr. Rossum (whose name translated into English signifies “Mr. Intellectual” or “Mr. Brain”), is a typical representative of the scientific materialism of the last [nineteenth] century. His desire to create an artificial man — in the chemical and biological, not mechanical sense — is inspired by a foolish and obstinate wish to prove God to be unnecessary and absurd. Young Rossum is the modern scientist, untroubled by metaphysical ideas; scientific experiment is to him the road to industrial production. He is not concerned to prove, but to manufacture.

Thus, “R.U.R.,” which gave birth to the robot, was a critique of mechanization and the ways it can dehumanize people. The word itself derives from the Czech word “robota,” or forced labor, as done by serfs. Its Slavic linguistic root, “rab,” means “slave.” The original word for robots more accurately defines androids, then, in that they were neither metallic nor mechanical.

"The Czech Play That Gave Us the Word ‘Robot’" (MIT Press Reader)

"Robots (The MIT Press Essential Knowledge Series)" by John M. Jordan (Amazon)

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Spoyl
72 days ago
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